Some ideas come in like a flash and then disappear so fast that I don’t have a chance to engage with them; and other ideas stick around through thick and thin. The latter are the ones that tend to make it onto records. I’d been kicking around “In the 1970s” for about five years before I finally decided to bring it in to the band. Also I am very, very critical of myself (hooray!); not just with music, but with all things. It helps, most of the time!

Soundfly courses are interactive, practice-based, motivational, and inspirational, and these are just some of the reasons why our students have continually come back to us with positive feedback, even more positive results, and often to take more courses in other fields.

“Joseph was a terrific mentor who provided extremely useful feedback for each assignment. The course was excellent… Soundfly courses are perhaps the best set of music courses I’ve ever taken!

Music grants

As expected, this album has almost everybody up in arms, siding one way or the other. There is no label. There are no distributors and no digital copies. To the Wu-Tang Clan, it’s not even an album but a singular work of art on par with an original Van Gogh or one of Shakespeare’s manuscripts. And at the price it will eventually be purchased for, who’s to argue with that?

Both of the new videos were made against countless odds: “In the 1970s” because of all the impossible ideas we wanted to make real, and “Felicity” because we had to find a place to shoot all 15 Baccis at the same time with essentially no budget. Thankfully due to my employment at Roulette Intermedium in Brooklyn, I was able to get a day there to shoot, and Chris Shields, a filmmaker/writer/musician who I’ve admired for years, was completely instrumental in making that video work as well as it did, considering that we filmed it in six hours by the skin of our teeth. It was Chris’ natural eye for dynamism and lighting that made it look so amazing, as well as the insane post-production he did which made it look like an old VHS copy of an Italian movie. My dream came true!

If you think through what music your listener was likely exposed to as a child, you can easily figure out how to write to job their nostalgia response. But it’s important to remember that “nostalgia” can also be associated equally with sentiments of sadness and loneliness as it can joy and comfort. As a composer, this is where it becomes important to play with instrumentation, timbre, and tempo, in order to get the right balance.

Be careful here. Don’t turn it up too loud and fool yourself into liking the result just because it’s louder. Do your best to match the input volume with the output volume of the compressor. We tend to think louder is better when it’s not really better, it’s just louder. Here’s a short video tutorial I shot below to show all of this in action on a mix I’ve started. Check it out!

Far too many first-rate bands can’t seem to make the leap from playing great shows in smaller clubs to playing big rooms on bills that people are actually excited about. A few years of playing smaller rooms and your band should be ready to start making a name for itself. But toiling away in obscurity, waiting for someone to discover you isn’t a viable way to make it as a musician. And if you live in a hyper-competitive music market such as New York City (like I do), you really can’t just wait around.

Grants for african writers

So when I found out there was a whole online culture of playlists for doggy consumption waiting for me out there on the internet, I was pretty stoked. I mean, I live for this stuff. Anything to make my dog’s life better, right?

I’ve learned this tip from experience. I’ve compared myself to other more successful (“better”) musicians and gone into a deep hole. The type of hole where I’m discouraged all day and don’t get very much done at all. So instead of wishing you had some other musician’s success or opportunities, put your blinders on and remember that you are you. Your story of success will look different than every other artist’s.

Soundfly course producer John Hull walks us through how he creates a Slice to MIDI preset in Ableton Live so you can build your own customized version.

Writer’s block can be a burden on any songwriter or artist’s progress. There are no hard and fast rules to songwriting and there are certainly no surefire ways to break out of writer’s block. If you are experiencing a block in your creativity, these steps may help you to rediscover your muse or ignite a creative spark that you’ve never had before. Whatever the case may be, the most important step in breaking out of a songwriter’s block is to keep writing and never give up despite your frustrations. The more you write, the easier it is to write. Share your own methods for breaking out of a creative block below.

Scratching has an instrument-like tactile immediacy, and more of the excitement of real-time improvisation, along with the possibility (in fact, strong likelihood) of failure. Serato assists you in some ways — it’s easy to line up tempos, do automated looping, and jump to preassigned cue points. But there isn’t that cushion of universal quantization you get in Ableton Session View.