Program fees: The residency fee, including room, studio, and residency programming, is $400/week ($57/day). Sponsorships are awarded based on merit and need. The cost to apply is $25.

Brad Pack is an award-winning audio engineer, writer, and educator based in Chicago, IL. Brad holds a Master’s degree in Electronic Media Production. When he’s not in front of his laptop, Brad can be found in the mosh pit.

When the studio asked for a song that sounds like The Beatles, Schlesinger decided to use similar instruments, style, and production techniques from the time period. If anyone in their 40s or 50s walked into the theater to watch the film, they were immediately transported back to their youth. For those of us too young to have lived through the early 1960s, it’s likely that our parents introduced us to the music of The Beatles at some point so that we’d have our own developmental reference point as well.

The musicians foundation scholarship

At the same time, it’s pretty easy to dismiss this idea of using old video game sound chips to cover well-known tunes as just some kind of novelty gimmick.

And then of course, all the notes that aren’t in the scale would be numbered and identified in relation to their function in a chord, but we won’t go into that right now. This all came about as a result of music psychologist Carol Krumhansl’s experiments on how average listeners judged the placement of a “probe tone” in a short melodic excerpt. These tests would later be known as “the probe tone experiments.”

The music business in 2019 has obviously changed immensely from what it was in 1919, but one thing about music hasn’t really changed all that much: It’s still inspirational, motivational, and capable of producing emotional power and beauty. Music itself brings people together, crosses boundaries, and inspires us to be better human beings, and the artists who make it often share their perspectives in the form of statements to the same result.

It’s very fluid and overlapped as to where the bridge stops and the verses begin with these mercurial lyrics bleeding over the bars like too much bubbly poured into your champagne flute. The outro gives you a funky meter fake-out. It sounds like they went to triplets or something, but all those odd accents still subdivide over three solid bars, believe it or not.

One look at Stereofox and it’s a streaming dream. The front page immediately presents you a bunch of streaming options, making it easy for you to select your mood and have the site curate tracks for you to discover immediately. It’s the least amount of work for the most amount of gain.

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Albuquerque’s open air flea market is the best place to find vintage records in town, and ones that are in surprisingly good condition. It’s a big flea market so you’ll need to get there early in order to cover serious ground. Not to mention they always have roasted green chile and sweet lollipops coated in red-chili powder (don’t knock it, till you try it)!

We all know that sound is a wave. The curves and spikes of our friend the “waveform” are a graphic representation of that wave’s action, traveling physically through air. If I clap my hands and record it into my DAW, the peaks and troughs on the screen represent the fluctuating changes in air pressure that cause the sensory phenomenon we call sound. These ripples of pressure in the air make our eardrums vibrate, so we can hear that sound.

At the time (six years ago), that literally meant listening to hours of music until I found the right song. The aim of the tool was quite simply to speed up the creation process and improve the quality of my playlists.

Ischi’s website welcomes visitors with a video clip of him and the chickens as soon as you enter. He also has a new song out called “The Chicken and the Egg,” but it doesn’t seem to be streamable online — although you can hear a 30-second excerpt here.

Welcome back to our interview series, Incorrect Music, curated by guitarist, singer, and composer Lora-Faye Åshuvud (of the band Arthur Moon). In this series, we present intimate conversations with artists who are striving to push the boundaries of their process and craft. Join our weekly email newsletter to get more insights like this into how professional artists are making music and how you can apply those lessons to your own music.